Eggplant – Nutrition, Benefits and Side Effects

Eggplants, also known as aubergines, belong to the nightshade family of plants and are used in many different dishes around the world.

Although often considered a vegetable, they’re technically a fruit, as they grow from a flowering plant and contain seeds.

In addition to bringing a unique texture and mild flavor to recipes, eggplant brings a host of potential health benefits.

Nutrition

Eggplants are a nutrient-dense food, meaning they contain a good amount of vitamins, minerals and fiber in few calories.

One cup (82 grams) of raw eggplant contains the following nutrients (2):

  • Calories: 20
  • Carbs: 5 grams
  • Fiber: 3 grams
  • Protein: 1 gram
  • Manganese: 10% of the RDI
  • Folate: 5% of the RDI
  • Potassium: 5% of the RDI
  • Vitamin K: 4% of the RDI
  • Vitamin C: 3% of the RDI

Eggplants also contain small amounts of other nutrients, including niacin, magnesium and copper.

Benefits of Eggplant

1.Prevents Cellular damage

Eggplants are high in anthocyanins, a pigment with antioxidant properties that can protect against cellular damage.

2. May Reduce the Risk of Heart Disease

Some animal studies have found that eggplants may improve heart function and reduce LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels, though human research is needed.

3. Promotes Blood Sugar Control

Eggplants are high in fiber and polyphenols, both of which may help reduce blood sugar levels.

4. Could Help Lose Weight

Eggplant is high in fiber but low in calories, both of which can help promote weight loss. It can also be used in place of higher-calorie ingredients.

5. May Have Cancer-Fighting Benefits

Eggplants contain solasodine rhamnosyl glycosides, which test-tube studies indicate may aid in cancer treatment. Eating more fruits and vegetables may also protect against some types of cancer.

6. Cognitive Function

Nasunin, an anthocyanin in eggplant skin, may help protect brain cell membranes from damage caused by free radicals. Nasunin also helps transport nutrients into cells and move waste out.

7. Eye health

Eggplant also contains the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin. Lutein appears to play a role in eye health, and it may help prevent age-related macular degeneration, which can lead to vision loss in older people.

Side Effects of Eggplant

When taken too much, Eggplant may cause some side effects like:

  • Nasunin and iron absorption

Nasunin, a phytochemical in eggplants, binds with iron and removes it from cells. Meanwhile, people with low levels of iron should not consume large amounts of foods that contain nasunin.

  • Solanine poisoning

Eggplants are part of the nightshade family. Nightshades contain alkaloids, including solanine, which can be toxic.

  • Allergy

In rare cases, one or more compounds triggers an allergic reaction. The primary cause appears to be a lipid transfer protein in the plant. Symptoms of a reaction can include hives, swelling, and difficulty breathing.

  • Oxalates and kidney stones

Eggplants contain oxalates, though they have fewer than most fruits and vegetables. Oxalates can contribute to kidney stone formation in some people who are more prone to absorbing oxalates.

Eggplant is a versatile ingredient that can be prepared and enjoyed in a variety of different ways.

References : Link1 | Link2

Follow us on Social Media for updates on latest articles and events! 
Was this article helpful? Then, please hit the like button. And let us know about your review in comment section.

You May Also Like

Recent Posts